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Saturday, July 16, 2005 - 11:21amSanction this postReply
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The pic didn't show up in the description so here it is. 

I enjoy Harry Potter books despite the mystical wizard theme.  I haven't read the book yet, because the kids get to read it first. Even without his magic powers Harry would be quite an amazing kid.  Harry at times has more courage than sense and searches for the truth beneath the surface....an admirable trait in my book.


 




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Post 1

Saturday, July 16, 2005 - 12:48pmSanction this postReply
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Went to the library in the morning with my son. Was surprised to find the newest Harry Potter there. So my son is reading it now and I'll have to wait...:-(

Love these HP books!




Post 2

Saturday, July 16, 2005 - 1:05pmSanction this postReply
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Both my daughters (ages 28 and 23) are fans of the books. I haven't read any yet but I love the movies. Perhaps I'll give them a try someday but my bookshelf is already overflowing with unread items.



Post 3

Saturday, July 16, 2005 - 3:00pmSanction this postReply
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I've got all the books - will get this new one next week - just didn't see to being up so bloody late... to say the least, they are quite imaginative works, and look forward to the whole series...



Post 4

Sunday, July 17, 2005 - 5:44amSanction this postReply
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My wife and I would have gotten our copy yesterday, but we were at the cinema when the mailman showed up. So we'll get it this week, and I'll probably get through it first since she's still re-reading the first five.



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Post 5

Sunday, July 17, 2005 - 8:41amSanction this postReply
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We didnt pre-order a copy, but we walked into the bookstore and got the LAST COPY!!!

In a world of magic, Harry uses common sense and bravery to solve dilemmas. This is fun, moral Objectivist fantasy, imo.



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Post 6

Monday, July 18, 2005 - 6:31amSanction this postReply
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Yes, I'm a Harry Potter fan too! I am sixteen years old.



Post 7

Monday, July 18, 2005 - 6:31pmSanction this postReply
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The whole Harry Potter series is over-hyped crap.



Post 8

Tuesday, July 19, 2005 - 2:20amSanction this postReply
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I have enjoyed the series, even though I find it a bit formulaic. I keep in mind that its written for a particular age group and enjoy the story never-the-less. I really enjoy the fact that it has introduced a huge number of young people to reading.

Ethan




Post 9

Tuesday, July 19, 2005 - 3:05amSanction this postReply
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Harry Potter is terrific :-)



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Post 10

Thursday, July 21, 2005 - 9:54pmSanction this postReply
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Just finished the 6th installment of the Parry Otter saga. Took me five evenings to finish it after my son finished it in one day and promptly spoiled everything for me. :-(

There are again some interesting new characters, some new puppy romances (maybe they will last this time), lots of fun stuff, and an extremely intriguing ending. It's a better book than the last one, IMO.

Yes, these were the books that hooked my son into reading. I've read through book 1-3 as bed time stories to my son when he was 6. And I told him that I was not going to read the 4th and 5th ones, both having 800+ pages. So, "HP and Goblet of Fire" is the very first serious book my son ever read...Now he is re-reading everything for the 4th or 5th times!

If anyone is interested, here are some Harry Potter Wizard Challenges to test your knowledge about these books.

(Edited by Hong Zhang on 7/21, 10:10pm)




Post 11

Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 11:52amSanction this postReply
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I agree with Erik. If you want to read good Fantasy, read the Sword of Truth series, by Objectivist author Terry Goodkind.



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Post 12

Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 5:35pmSanction this postReply
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I wish some Objectivists would stop being such literalistic dolts when approaching fantasy fiction. Fantasy is a perfectly legitimate genre: nobody takes the metaphysical premises of fantasy and sci-fi stories seriously; these worlds simple allow the author (and audience) to "play" with ideas, exercise their imaginations and explore issues (including matters of good and evil) in symbolic forms that rarely exist so purely in the real world.

I've read all the Harry Potter novels to date, and am about 100 pages into the latest installment. J. K. Rowling is a creative genius; I laugh with delight about once every page at her inventiveness, satirical brilliance and sheer literacy.

The "magical" parallel universe of Harry Potter conforms to its own very strict internal rules; magic is treated as a kind of a  science, with its own unbreakable facts and principles which students are required to study and master. It often serves as a hilarious satire on the real world, with Rowling inexhaustibly creative in coming up with clever metaphors for our actual daily lives.

Most important to these stories -- and a large part of their universal appeal -- is not their metaphysics, but their morality.  The "good" kids Rowling depicts in this long, imaginative coming-of-age series are all brave, intelligent, rational, loyal and honorable. They face their fears, standing up to irrational and evil adults, sticking to their knowledge, their principles and each other.

Moreover, they are all individualist misfits in one way or the other. Rowling celebrates their uniqueness as well as their virtues, making them wonderful role models for children (and adults, for that matter).

It's no surprise that the Harry Potter series has become a modern literary phenomenon, for it conveys -- with wit and whimsy and wonder -- timeless virtues and values that are entirely consistent with Objectivism. I can think of no greater gift to a youngster than to introduce him or her to Harry and his world. For it may just give a child exactly what he needs to face a world of far less admirable Muggles. 




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Post 13

Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 7:01pmSanction this postReply
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Robert Bidinotto

> I wish some Objectivists would stop being such literalistic
> dolts when approaching fantasy fiction. Fantasy is a
> perfectly legitimate genre: nobody takes the metaphysical
> premises of fantasy and sci-fi stories seriously; these
> worlds simple allow the author (and audience) to "play" with
> ideas, exercise their imaginations and explore issues
> (including matters of good and evil) in symbolic forms that
> rarely exist so purely in the real world.

I agree. The trappings of fantasy and science fiction are just that, trappings. If attending the theater, is it more important to pay attention to the actors, or to the stage? When reading a novel, is it not a mistake to focus on the setting and ignore the plot and the characters?

If I had children, I would read to them the Harry Potter books. And if Ayn Rand objects, she can drag herself out of her grave and tell me so in person. Frankly, I'd rather see my son look up to Harry Potter instead of 50 Cent, and I'd rather my daughter emulated Hermione instead of that talentless trollop Jessica Simpson.



Post 14

Tuesday, July 26, 2005 - 7:21pmSanction this postReply
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I'd have to agree with both of the above posts.  The trappings of science fiction and fantasy often offer a filter through which other factors which the author deems worth study become more clear.

And on a side note Mr. Bidinatto you've once again done an excellent job of explaining a deeply held conviction of my own with more skill than I would be capable of.  Well I'm hoping to be capable some day.

---Landon




Post 15

Wednesday, July 27, 2005 - 1:58amSanction this postReply
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Great post, Robert. The word Fantasy implies fantastic, improbable. Have fun with it! It's supposed to be a world where anything you want can happen!



Post 16

Wednesday, July 27, 2005 - 4:59amSanction this postReply
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Anything you want, Joe, as long as you don't contradict yourself. If you create a fantastical world, you still have to maintain logical consistency or the story falls apart.



Post 17

Wednesday, July 27, 2005 - 5:27amSanction this postReply
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Matthew, haven't you ever seen Looney Tunes? Wacky Land? :) And the Simpson's break those rules all the time...and the stories fall apart, but that's the fun of it!

"What plow? Marge, what are you talking about? 'Call Mr. Plow, that's his name...'".


(Edited by Joe Maurone
on 7/27, 5:33am)




Post 18

Wednesday, July 27, 2005 - 5:34amSanction this postReply
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And I wanna easter egg, I wanna easter egg!



Post 19

Wednesday, July 27, 2005 - 5:34amSanction this postReply
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I need to go to bed.



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