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Post 0

Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 9:32amSanction this postReply
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Joe-

I will be rereading that essay many times. Here, as a musician, and everything else I am, let me just say it: that was fucking fantastic!

I particularly appreciate how you have talked about (probably my favorite) topic from the standpoint of myth. It is interesting how the subject of myth has shifted over time, from myths about animals, to the planets and stars, and in the end to man himself, his journey.

Wonderful, thank you.

rde


Post 1

Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 11:30amSanction this postReply
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Bravo Giuseppe! loved it!

Post 2

Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 2:08pmSanction this postReply
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Why doesn't SOLO have a dedicated music category? I think I posited Joe and Landon to head it once, but no one stepped up to the plate.

Anyone hear the new Stevie Wonder album yet?

Ayn Rand and art...look up her comments on the promise of tap-dancing.....

rde
We're selling Mario Lanza bricks for two Atlas points, hyeah...


Post 3

Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 2:18pmSanction this postReply
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Rich,

Check the note from the Editor at the end of Joe's article.


Post 4

Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 4:22pmSanction this postReply
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Thank you, Ciro and Rich.
Rich, glad you liked it, so I'll cut you some slack for not knowing about the forum...we'll chalk up your missing that to your exitement. But next time it's excommunication! ;P
(Edited by Joe Maurone
on 10/20, 4:23pm)


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Thursday, October 20, 2005 - 5:32pmSanction this postReply
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Yeah - might as well put me in for a member, since have postings on it... and am curious what others might add to the discussion...

Post 6

Friday, October 21, 2005 - 8:50amSanction this postReply
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Whoops-- I was already on a reread... :) Good, never mind.

Post 7

Sunday, September 21 - 2:19pmSanction this postReply
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This is well worth the time to read it slowly.  Unfortunately, it did not create much more discussion or a fertile field for similar speculation.  I think that medium is a problem. In other words, to talk about the future of music is the wrong mode of expression.  Would we attempt paintings to portray the future of music, or sonnets or  sonatas to speculate on sculpture?  ("Ode on a Grecian Urn", yes, of course... but it was still a view of a thing already created.)  I confess that I have nothing to offer.  It is not what I do.  I listen to music; I do not create it.



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Post 8

Sunday, September 21 - 3:52pmSanction this postReply
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"Talking about music is like dancing about architecture", or so it's been said...

I obviously disagree, or else, I wouldn't have wrote that. But...This is another entry of mine that long predates, yet anticipates, my reading of Jane Jacobs' Systems of Survival, a reading that has given me a new dimension of understanding to what I've already wrote...(I was already on that track, thanks to such books about marketing and technology like The Deviant's Advantage and The Myth of Innovation) And while I don't have a problem talking about music, I've grown to understand the problems about talking about "the future" (or, at least, THE future, much like Frediano has a problem with talking about THE economy...).  Same with THE future of music. I'd have to reread this article, but I'd just clarify, now, that when I think of "future" music, I refer to the possible, rather than "the inevitable".

(And because I don't believe that music is statically recieved, and not even music until it's heard as such by the mind, I'll add that I reject the notion of "platonic" notions of music that unite all humanity, or something akin to an "ur song", or "music of the spheres", etc...might seem odd to have to say that on an Objectivist forum, except that James Kilburn once published a an alternate history of Mario Lanza here, promoting such an idea, in the service of "Perigonian" ideas of the superiority of certain types of music...the idea of music being percieved as a static event every time, versus a dynamic reaction dependent on context and experience has a parallel in Jacobs' ideas on static "guardians" and dynamic "traders" [and these "alternative histories" of the superiority of classic artists point to the conservative, "guardian" tendencies of a Kilbourne or Perigo], as well as the static/dynamic approach to the future in the ideas of Virgina Postrel in The Future and its Enemies...)

 

(Edited by Joe Maurone on 9/21, 5:08pm)



Post 9

Wednesday, October 1 - 3:11amSanction this postReply
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Glad I saw this, great article Joe.

 

I am a fan of this guy Myles Kennedy.

http://youtu.be/5qzeLeBHsN4



Post 10

Sunday, October 12 - 12:42pmSanction this postReply
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I understand the problem, of course.  The limitation to "dancing about architecture" is the paucity of our dance vocabulary.  On the other hand +gesture+ we speak and write well about complicated subjects.  I like world music, Afro-Celtic, that sort of expression, even as my favorites are all in the Western Classical tradition.  That is a worldwide performance, bringining to it musicians from Asia, even though (as far as I know) few westerners have excelled - or bothered to excel - at Chinese music, for instance.  African music seems a little easier to absorb and to be assimilated into. I have two recordings of ancient Greek music.  It is horrible stuff, very crude, not sonorous, and lacking even ABBA sonata form, just linear.  During the European Middle Ages, a time denigrated by Objectivists, not only were new forms invented, but also new instruments on which to play them.  

 

I agree that music has no future "the".  We need the archaic plural: "these futures of musics."  

 

Here is a bad example of Western music gone global.  Jung Lin plays every note perfectly, as written.  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9-2jM5RNSs

 

But her dragon mother beat the sponteneity out of her and she never danced for feeling, so she cannot play Liszt with feeling because it was based on dance.  

 

This performance of the Monti Csardas is a modern re-creation of the traditional form, something done standing, but intended to be done laying down.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMOHAcjlIWs

 

So, in this Liszt H Rh 2 Valetina Lisitsa interprets more than a little... but I Liszt did also. Showmanship is also part of musicianship or no one would ever leave the recording studio.  (Although, that, too might have been a blessing to Chopin, who hated big audiences.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdH1hSWGFGU

 

I also agree that Jacobs hit the nail on the head with the guardians who preserve traditions.  Necessary as they are to traditional guardianship when we apply the wrong syndrome, we get bad results.  I mean I like Lanza, too; I grew up with his Student Prince and Vagabond King, but I don't sacrifice goats to his image.  Lots of people have pipes.  

 

Jan Peerce sings "Granada"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vrx4qDZR_RY

 

Here's a duet, Sting and Cheb Mami, "Desert Rose"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3lWwBslWqg

 

(Edited by Michael E. Marotta on 10/12, 12:53pm)



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