About
Content
Store
Forum

Rebirth of Reason
War
People
Archives
Objectivism

Post to this threadMark all messages in this thread as readMark all messages in this thread as unread


Sanction: 2, No Sanction: 0
Post 0

Friday, August 19, 2005 - 5:39amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
It might be better than my own Tipler, who is quite very technical on Hadrons, Leptons, quarks and so on. I'd like to know how deep it goes into the scientific material. Are there any discussions about Proton-collapse and such, or is it just like Stephen Hawking's "Universe in a nutshell"?




Post 1

Friday, August 19, 2005 - 6:05amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
No proton collapse.  It's not too technical, focusing more on the concepts than the details.

Sarah




Sanction: 4, No Sanction: 0
Sanction: 4, No Sanction: 0
Post 2

Friday, August 19, 2005 - 6:44amSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
Might I also recommend Bill Bryson's "A Short History Of Nearly Everything", which, as the name suggests, does what it says on the tin (so to speak), if you happen to be from outside the scientific community. To save my fraught little fingers further typing in singing its praises might I suggest giving it a Google or, perhaps, even a little caress of the spine next time you visit your friendly neighbourhood bookshop.



Post 3

Monday, August 22, 2005 - 8:32pmSanction this postReply
Bookmark
Link
Edit
Flatlanders & assorted higher dimensional beings,-

I read 'Hyperspace' in High School as my concession to knowing something about cosmology. Reckon I'll die without needing to read a second book on the subject.

Got all the theories and biographies. Lets you into the "world" of cosmology. Talks about the 'old' days of manual mathematics. Also semi-autobiographical, about a boy-wonder who made good and is still in the game- and who can write very well.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0385477058/ref=sib_dp_pt/002-6029686-1233658#reader-link




Post to this thread
User ID Password reminder or create a free account.