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Post 0

Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 8:29amSanction this postReply
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I've heard good things about this book. What is the age range of the target audience?

Thanks,

~Jenn



Post 1

Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 8:39amSanction this postReply
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I'd say maybe preteen to adult?  I enjoyed it a few years ago.  Just a warning, it has some pretty violent stuff - ex:  throwing malatoff (?) cocktails at the opposition.

Kelly




Post 2

Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 3:18pmSanction this postReply
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This book is available on Amazon which lists it for young adults. I've seen listings for it elsewhere giving an age range of 9 or 10 and up. I've never read this book but I had bought a copy from Laissez-Faire Books for one of my daughters when she was about ten years old. She said she loved it.



Post 3

Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 3:32pmSanction this postReply
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Kelly R. E. wrote: "I enjoyed it a few years ago.  Just a warning, it has some pretty violent stuff - ex:  throwing malatoff (?) cocktails at the opposition."

That's "Molotov" and it is pretty tame. Lisa brandishes a firearm, too. And her brother gets beat up in the beginning, right?  But it is all very sanitary violence.

It is not like "... smashing on the sidewalk to throw gasoline on the boys.  Their clothes ignited, searing their faces, burning away their hair in an instant.  No sooner had the shock registered than screams were torn from their throats to twist pitably as their lips burned away, revealing deathskull grins as their teeth were exposed before bursting.  They fell to the ground, writhing, howling, clutching and tearing at their burning skin, kicking uselessly at the flaming air around them."

It's not like that at all.

Also missing was this: "Lisa looked at him in a new way.  Her heart began to race. She closed her hands and she felt that her palms were wet and then she was aware of a new wetness.  He smiled back at her uncertainly, his head held in that funny charming way that she first saw on a crisp autumn day.  Only last fall, she thought, and yet, a lifetime ago.  Her clothes were binding her, suffocating her, she had to tear them off or else... She giggled. "You know," she said, "the generator needs to be looked at."  Brad heaved a sigh of relief and nodded.

None of that, either.  It is just a book for kids.  It is pretty tame.
 




Post 4

Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 7:15pmSanction this postReply
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[Bob] "I've seen listings for it elsewhere giving an age range of 9 or 10 and up."

At my school, it's taught in the 5th grade. These are very advanced kids. It's very popular with them. "Anthem" is taught to all 8th graders.





Post 5

Wednesday, March 23, 2005 - 8:15pmSanction this postReply
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I've read it, and it's a beautiful book which I would recommend for any child. It has to be inspiring for a child, because it focuses on how much he or she can accomplish.

The writer IS an Objectivist.

Barbara



Post 6

Thursday, March 24, 2005 - 6:35pmSanction this postReply
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I listened to an audio version of this book a while ago, but I seem to remember a passage about a special book that the main protagonist refers to. My recollection is that it was never stated what the title is. Is that correct? Does anyone know or have a guess what book was being referred to?



Post 7

Friday, March 25, 2005 - 6:45pmSanction this postReply
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A warning, tho - the version now in print is NOT the same one as originally written... some of the implied AS is now missing, for instance.....

As an aside, it is quite clear there was to be more to this, as a series - whatever happened to this Nelson - he seems to be much a blank....




Post 8

Monday, April 11, 2005 - 2:14pmSanction this postReply
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I can't believe that in this "Age of Information" that there is NO biographical information on the author of The Girl Who Owned a City!  To add my voice to the previous post: whatever happened to OT Nelson?



Post 9

Monday, July 10, 2006 - 9:33amSanction this postReply
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I don't think anyone knows what happened to him. It's a good book and could have had some sequels. I asked about him years ago.




Post 10

Monday, July 10, 2006 - 8:00pmSanction this postReply
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(His disappearance is like something out of Atlas Shrugged.)

However, his book remains popular.  Of course, the libertarians sell it.  More interesting is that it is still in print, sold to other publishers, and that an audio tape has been produced.

1977 Dell Paperback 92893-1/Laurel leaf science ficton.
1995 Runestone Press Books:
School & Library Binding  Publisher: Rebound by Sagebrush (July 2003)

The reviews are always touchstones of the soul.
From School Library Journal
Grade 5-8 The Girl Who Owned a City by O.T. Nelson (Runestone, 1995) is a sober survival story about a fifth grade girl identified simply as Lisa. The novel recounts Lisas struggle to care for herself and her younger brother in a world where everyone over the age of 12 has been wiped out by a mysterious plague. Forced to steal and afraid of gangs of child thieves, the pair go from barricading themselves in their basement to working with neighborhood children to form a militia. Lisa demonstrates her skills in creative problem solving as she finds food sources and establishes a secure community in an abandoned high school. However, the use of weapons such as firearms, bombs and other violent means of ensuring safety are disturbing. The compelling premise of the story is marred by inconsistencies in the plot. While its possible to believe that an 11- year-old could master driving a car, it is hard to understand why only a week after all the adults have died there is no mention of corpses. Julie Dretzin does a fine reading of the sometimes meandering story. The importance of working together and thinking before acting are recurring themes in this novel. With ample discussion and analysis. this presentation could be a jumping off point for a unit on violence.Barbara Wysocki, Cora J. Belden Library, Rocky Hill, CT
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.
Reviewer Barbara Wysocki apparently does not understand the difference between taking something from an abandoned warehouse and taking something from a person.  Both, to her, are "stealing." 
A deadly plague has swept the earth, killing everyone over the age of 12. Children are hungry and afraid. Some have joined fierce gangs that roam the streets, bullying and stealing. The children of Grand Avenue have a better life than most. Lisa, their 10-year-old leader, has found a supply of food. She has even devised a plan to keep them safe -- for now. They have a lot to learn, though, such as how to defend the school that is now their city, how to get along with each other, and how to do all the jobs that adults used to do. Espousing such values as cooperation and the importance of making informed choices, O.T. Nelson tempers a potentially disturbing situation with a strong young heroine and a positive prognosis for the future. Julie Dretzin's skilled narration brings life to this powerful book requested by teachers all over the country.
"working together... co-operation... informed choices..." 
 Do you think it is statistically likely that all of these reviewers never understood that Lisa was reading Atlas Shrugged?  Do you think they are pretending that we will not know?




Post 11

Monday, July 10, 2006 - 8:42pmSanction this postReply
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As I mentioned, the latter versions are not the same as the original - for one, reference even obliquely to AS are removed...



Post 12

Monday, July 10, 2006 - 9:45pmSanction this postReply
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There was also a hardback version. But it's probably long out-of-print.




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