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Post 0

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 2:13amSanction this postReply
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Wonderful article! A delicious integration of two of my favorite things. (Liz K. can attest to one of those.) Thank you!

Post 1

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 2:14amSanction this postReply
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It is I who thank you.  ;)

Jennifer


Post 2

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 3:13amSanction this postReply
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Oy! Quit phlirting, you two! What do you think this is? A place of phun & larphter?

Phlinz

Post 3

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 3:53amSanction this postReply
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"The sight of a peach evokes images of a woman’s delicate cheeks."

 

Hmmm Hmmm, I know which cheeks you mean :-)

 

"I have often explained to my male friends the reasoning behind preparing a meal for a woman they want to seduce. This is not rocket science. Excite her palate, for then her body will come alive with the next phase of anticipation."

 

And it is often said the best scientists make the best cooks - a well-prepared experiment takes the same skills as a well-prepared meal. Therefore, good scientists are good seducers :-)


Post 4

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 4:05amSanction this postReply
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Jennifer,

Let me simply say - thank you :-)

MH


Post 5

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 4:41amSanction this postReply
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Dear gentlemen,

It is so sad that I did not join SOLO before my trip to the UK in May.  Sigh...

;)


Post 6

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 5:28amSanction this postReply
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Jennifer,

Just for reference (in case of any future UK visits): Marcus is taken. I am single.

 ;-)

MH

(Edited by Matthew Humphreys on 8/18, 5:29am)


Post 7

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 6:56amSanction this postReply
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I'm really happy to see this article up here, Jennifer.  It does make me realize the two things in life I'm missing the most of, and makes me want to at least get through the frozen dinner and chef boyarde lifestyle i've had out here since moving to upstate Illinois. ;)  I hope you keep contributing here, as a lot of people will gain from your writing. :) 
-Dominic


Post 8

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 11:01amSanction this postReply
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What are you doing later?

(Oh, damn. I forgot two things: 1) I am madly, insanely, passionately, and completely in love, and, 2) I'm queer as a plaid rabbit. )

It could have been great....

Post 9

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 12:20pmSanction this postReply
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You guys are killing me, and I love you for it.  :D

Jennifer


Post 10

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 7:13amSanction this postReply
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and you must be the most esquisite of women, for your sensuous love of foods outshines even julia's...

[ps - i, too, am single]


Post 11

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 6:29pmSanction this postReply
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Interesting article...

My dad would love it; he's half Italian, and he always drove us insane with cooking and guilting us into eating... He used to make this one dish... it's a soup... with olive oil, anchovies, broccoli and linguine.  And oh yeah, romano cheese.  He hated parmesan; said it was too bland.

As much as I like this kind of food, my own personal tastes lean toward Japanese and Thai cooking, because they don't include milk products, and I'm violently allergic to dairy... the cow's milk protein casein, actually.  And they find a way to slip casein into everything, even "non-dairy" foods, the bastards.

And you know, I've never had a truffle.  But I've heard they're supposed to be good. 

Speaking of truffles, Dr. Drew and Adam Corolla did a rant about words that don't sound like what they really are.  A black fungus that grows underground and pigs dig up, you shouldn't think be called a "truffle".  The pig sniffs it out, is given a cookie instead, and then later on gets its throat cut and fed along with what it sniffed out underground... some thanks.  *L*  But anyways, when you hear the word "truffle", you think of something light and flakey, not this whole scene.

"Garnishing" your wages is another such term.  They made me laugh when they said something like, "Hey, you know, that word 'garnish' sounds so great... I don't know about you, but if someone asked me if they could 'garnish' my wages, I'd be like, sure... a little parsley, a curly ribbon of radish; sure, put me down.  Garnish my wages". 

Both terms are pretty words to describe a macabre scene.



Post 12

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 6:29pmSanction this postReply
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Interesting article... Refined and yet raw at the same time.

My dad would love it; he's half Italian, and he always drove us insane with cooking and guilting us into eating... He used to make this one dish... it's a soup... with olive oil, anchovies, broccoli and linguine.  And oh yeah, romano cheese.  He hated parmesan; said it was too bland.

As much as I like this kind of food, my own personal tastes lean toward Japanese and Thai cooking, because they don't include milk products, and I'm violently allergic to dairy... the cow's milk protein casein, actually.  And they find a way to slip casein into everything, even "non-dairy" foods, the bastards.

And you know, I've never had a truffle.  But I've heard they're supposed to be good. 

Speaking of truffles, Dr. Drew and Adam Corolla did a rant about words that don't sound like what they really are.  A black fungus that grows underground and pigs dig up, you shouldn't think be called a "truffle".  The pig sniffs it out, is given a cookie instead, and then later on gets its throat cut and fed along with what it sniffed out underground... some thanks.  *L*  But anyways, when you hear the word "truffle", you think of something light and flakey, not this whole scene.

"Garnishing" your wages is another such term.  They made me laugh when they said something like, "Hey, you know, that word 'garnish' sounds so great... I don't know about you, but if someone asked me if they could 'garnish' my wages, I'd be like, sure... a little parsley, a curly ribbon of radish; sure, put me down.  Garnish my wages". 

Both terms are pretty words to describe a macabre scene.

(Edited by Orion Reasoner on 8/18, 6:30pm)


Post 13

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 7:28pmSanction this postReply
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Truffles are surprisingly delicate, as they are normally served in thin shavings that add a refined touch to a dish.  And they are actually hunted by dogs now instead of pigs, as I believe the pigs were a bit too greedy with their bounty.  ;)

The soup you are alluding to sounds similar to something my father used to make as well, though without the anchovies.  Good thing -- he ate enough revolting dishes to last me a lifetime (don't ask me about fish eyeballs).  He was fresh off the boat from Calabria, so there was no such thing as an *inedible* part of an animal.  Ah, the sweet smell of tripe wafting through the kitchen on a sunny afternoon...   <wretch>

I am partial to Thai as well, and will shortly be experimenting with some great ingredients en route to me from a friend in Portland, Oregon.  We should trade recipes.  :)

Jennifer


Post 14

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 7:30pmSanction this postReply
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Thank you Dominic!

I was wondering where you disappeared to.  Please don't tell me you are eating powdered mac and cheese, or the little Italian mama in me is going to have to create a care package...

xoxoxoxoxoxo

Jennifer    <--------  looooooooves Dominic


Post 15

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 7:44pmSanction this postReply
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I have to say that some of the best times I've had have been over a fine meal! At my last (hell) job, my boss and I would often retire during the late nights to local restaurants to partake of food, spirits, and philosophical discussions. When my wife and I want to take a break from the daily life of being parents and homeowners, its off to the good eats places for a few jolly hours of care-free conversation and eating!

Ethan


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Post 16

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 8:31pmSanction this postReply
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Though you might enjoy this from one of the novels of my favourite "light" author, Terry Pratchett.  The dwarf, Casanunda {whose business card reads "Worlds second greatest Lover; We try harder: stepladder supplied"} is trying to seduce the witch, Nanny Ogg.

He was sitting with his chin on his hand, watching in her in rapt infatuation.
He was, he was surprised to find, enjoying himself immensely while not horizontal.
He knew how this sort of dinner was supposed to go. It was one of the basic weapons in the seducers' armoury.  The amoratrix was plied with fine wines and expensive yet light dishes.  There was much knowing eye contact across the table, and tangling of feet underneath it.  There was much pointed eating of pears and bananas and so on. And thus the ship of temptation steered, gently yet inexorably, to a good docking.
 
And so on.
Cass


Post 17

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 9:40pmSanction this postReply
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Jennifer,

I've heard stories of eating eyeballs and all sorts of awfulness.  Not my scene.

But I do like sushi.  No; that's not right... I love sushi.  Particularly sashimi, because I can do without the rice.  And I can eat wasabi like mad.

I like all the types like eel and squid and roe... but not uni (sea urchin).  It is baby poop yellow, and tastes to me like post-nasal drip from a sinus infection. 


Post 18

Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 11:10pmSanction this postReply
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My idea of a perfect evening is a dinner party ( preferably four to eight), a complete opera or a GREAT movie, conversation and drinks in the garden, guests who come on time and know when to leave, whether that be 10:00PM or 4:00AM, and then romance with my sweetheart from sweet to awesome. I love to bake lasagna's or different pasta dishes, or great Mexican feasts. Lots of salads and fruits and chocolate. Morning, with or without overnighters, is great orange juice, great breads and GREAT coffee.
The opera is the center of everything, and we "go to" it in reverent respect. Or I love to play songs that seem to just spring from each other; the three greatest "nessun dorma's", Lanza singing Cole Porter, Domingo singing classic spanish songs. Ella Fitzgerald, Andrew Lloyd Webber, and Puccini and more Puccini. Mahler and Strauss for seriously involved... I love to prepare the meals alone, and I love to clean up afterwards with my partner, because we do it so easily together. I like afternoon and evening to fall into night and morning without any seams showing.
If that sounds good to you, I hope you will visit me and Sergio when you are in Los Angeles. I love to meet the kind of people that would still be reading this...

Post 19

Thursday, August 19, 2004 - 2:28amSanction this postReply
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James - I'd better not visit you for one of your "perfect" evenings, since we would assuredly come to blows. I would want *much* more Lanza than just Cole Porter, *none* of that nasal squawker Domingo at all, a liberal lashing of Wunderlich instead, some Moffo & Callas, *none* of Mahler or Strauss (unless you meant Johann, which I doubt) since they are portentous, droning bores, as opposed to Rach, upon whom I would *insist* - AND NO SALADS. I will have *no* truck with *any* of that "healthy" muck.

Still, I suppose the arguments would be memorable.

:-)

Linz

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